28 FEBRUARY 2023

Seeking solutions to energy poverty and gender inequality in Namibia, Botswana, and the DRC

This month we showcased the Democratic Republic of Congo, Namibia and Botswana. The goal was to investigate how to advance and institutionalise gender equality in these markets’ energy sector. Gender equality is critical in the African energy sector for promoting inclusive economic growth and long-term development. Women are frequently underrepresented in the sector, with limited access to market, finance, technology and networks. From an employment equity perspective access to skills development equal pay, and opportunities for advancement remain barriers for women professionals.

A McKinsey analysis on inclusion estimates that at the current rate of development, it will take 151 years to close the gender economic gap worldwide, 29 years to reach gender parity in executive teams, and 24 years to achieve ethnic diversity. This means that to-date the hardest-hit groups on the continent by energy poverty are women, young people, persons with disabilities, and marginalised groups. 

To address these challenges, efforts are being made to increase women’s participation and leadership in the energy sector. For example in this webinar, we had representatives from each country to speak about their efforts to reduce gender inequality in the industry. AWEaP has established this important platform for participants in Africa’s energy ecosystem to get together and discuss the development of various value chains in order to unearth untapped business prospects. This gives current and potential business owners essential information about business opportunities.

Gender equality in Africa’s energy sector necessitates a multifaceted approach that includes policy and regulatory frameworks, investment in education and training programmes, and efforts to address cultural and social barriers to women’s participation. By empowering women in the energy sector, we can build more inclusive and sustainable energy systems that benefit everyone.

The following stakeholders were invited to share insights on the construct of energy value chains and opportunities emerging as countries endeavour to achieve security of energy supply: Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs):

Our monthly webinars include OEMs like Rockwell Automation for the following reasons:

OEMs design and manufacture products, services, solutions and systems sought after by utilities and different large power users in the energy and power sector. We invite them to share trends in electricity system digitisation, decarbonisation and decentralisation. We invite them to showcase how they enable access to technology for SMMEs, especially women owned companies.

Multilateral and Regional Organisations:

Showcase supportive programmes designed and executed in the countries in line with Gender mainstreaming in the energy and power sector. These organisations are made up of three or more countries that collaborate on issues of mutual interest and global importance.

These organisations can use funds from multiple governments to fund a variety of projects.

Energy Industry Leaders

Individuals and organisations that are experts in their domestic energy market, even regional markets. They possess deep insights into the structure of the energy market, players, policies and developments. They are highly effective in the industry and have a sterling track record. We invited industry leaders to share their insights and to explain complex policy concepts.

Industry Associations

Building reciprocal value adding networks is fundamental to the success of any entrepreneur. We are a non-competitive platform and organisation. We collaborate with other associations to build a supportive and inclusive energy ecosystem.

Programme

Content Framework

Webinar 2

Speakers

Introduction

Introduction to AWEaP

Purpose of the webinar and Introduction to the topics.

AWEaP

MS. BERTHA DLAMINI
Founding President
African Women In Energy And Power NPC

OEM

Access to Technology

Highlights of projects in Botswana, Namibia and DRC.

Rockwell Automation

MS. THOBEKA SISHUBA
Account Executive
Sub-Saharan Africa

Utility 1

Access to market:

Utility strategy and focus

Enabling Smart Cities & opportunities for SMMEs.

Integration of renewable energy.

Procurement process and Gender mainstreaming.

NamPower

MS. PAULINA KANDALI LYAMBO
Executive
Modified Single Buyer (MSB)

Industry Association

Women in Energy

LEAN IN E&S 

MS. YARA PÓVOA
Circle Leader
Lean In Equity and Sustainability

Regional Organisation

Access to market, finance, networks and technology in Southern Africa for Women

SACREEE

MS. KORNELIA LIPINGE-SILISHEBO
Project Coordinator
Entrepreneurship Support Facility SADC Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Energy Expert

Gender Mainstreaming in Energy and Power markets

DRC

MR. TRESOR MBAYAHE
Energy Expert

Entrepreneurs Testimony

Entrepreneurial Testimony on access to market, finance, networks and technology:

Moving beyond boundaries in the Energy Sector: Lessons and Tips

Botswana

MS. CHARMAINE HASSEN
Managing Director Solamatics Botswana

DRC

MR. LANDRY DJIMPÉ
CEO
Lux Africa

Namibia

MS. RAUNA SHEEFENI
Managing Director
Lakadiva Investment cc

Close

Closing Remarks:
SDG 7
SDG 5
SDG 8

AWEaP

MS. BERTHA DLAMINI
African Women In Energy And Power NPC

Watch our webinar and download presentations shared by speakers:

We encourage you to do the following:

  1. Visit our YouTube channel
  2. Watch previous webinars
  3. Take notes from the presentations given
  4. Note the tips shared on how you can gain entry into the energy and power sector as an entrepreneur
  5. Note programmes in place to address some of the barriers:
    1. Access to market
    2. Access to skills development
    3. Access to finance
    4. Access to technology
  6. Download presentations and listen to the recorded webinar again
  7. Follow through by: visiting websites and taking the initiative to build the network necessary to enable your participation.

Inspiration

“Technology is the most powerful tool for supporting women. It can really make a quick and transformative change in reducing gender inequality, and defeating the injustices that girls face not only in technology but because of their own gender in general. Consequently, harnessing the potential of this industry is critically important.”

Nino Enukidze, Rector of the Business and Technology University

“A gender-equal society would be one where the word ‘gender’ does not exist: where everyone can be themselves.”

Gloria Steinem

“Gender equality is more than a goal in itself. It is a precondition for meeting the challenge of reducing poverty, promoting sustainable development and building good governance.”

Kofi Annan